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Archive for the ‘Margaret Wilson b1858’ Category

Bought Ones (Scotland)

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The last of the commercial prints or postcards in Lavinia‘s album are these four of scenes around Edinburgh. Olive Shaw in 1962 said that Lavinia’s father had a trip overseas probably to Scotland in about 1891 or 1892 “with wife, Eileen and Olive plus Effie, Eva and nurse” and another with youngest daughter Ailsa in about 1897 but it is unclear whether Lavinia accompanied them on either. Whatever the case, these postcards are likely from one of those trips.

The initials “J.V.” on three of the prints indicate that they were by the studio of James Valentine, one of the most prolific commercial photographers operating in Scotland at that time. The other with initials “G.W.W” would be from the studio of his largest competitor, George Washington Wilson (no relation to Margaret as far as I can determine).

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The Chancel, Rosslyn Chapel

The Chancel, Rosslyn Chapel

James Valentine studio (1880s?)

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Melrose Abbey

Melrose Abbey

James Valentine studio (1880s?)

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Dryburgh Abbey

Dryburgh Abbey

James Valentine studio (1880s?)

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“Linlithgow Palace”

Linlithgow Palace

George Washington Wilson studio (1880s?)

Bought ones

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In Lavinia Shaw‘s album are a number of commercial landscape photographs, the postcards of the time. Most are of scenes from around Tasmania so maybe Lavinia travelled there in the 1880s or early 1890s, or maybe she was given them as a set.

Two of these “postcards” are not of Tasmania but seem to have been included in the album for their connection to Alfred Shaw’s second wife Margaret Wilson.

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“Ballantrae Ayrshire”

Ballantrae is on the Ayrshire coast about 50 miles south of Glasgow. If we travel down the road in the foreground, cross the river and immediately turn right along the minor road on the other bank we will reach Colmonell after 2 or 3 miles. This was where Margaret was born and where during her childhood her father was a farmer and the local GP.

Looking out across the water we can see a conical island with the much larger Isle of Arran behind. To the left in the far distance is the Kintyre peninsular. The conical island is Ailsa Craig and this is almost certainly the origin of Margaret’s third child’s name, Ailsa Wilson Shaw (if a boy would he have been named Craig?). Interestingly, (for me anyway) in 2002 before I knew anything much about Margaret or Ailsa I spent a week or so in a cottage on the south of Arran and looked out daily at the changing light on Kintyre and Ailsa Craig.

Looking closely at the white writing along the bottom of the photo we can see what looks like “0233 Ballantrae from S.W. Poulton’s Series”. A quick search turned up this from the Glasgow University site:

Poulton or ‘Poulton’s Series’ are probably linked to the photographer, publisher and printer Samuel E Poulton (1819-1898), who was based in London and south-east England. His son, Alfred Walford Poulton, was also involved in the business, which may well have published prints taken by local photographers around the country. It has also been suggested that the Edinburgh-based photographer Thomas Polson Lugton was behind the Poulton series. He certainly may have been responsible for some of the scenes taken in Scotland.

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“Donald”

Donald is a bit under 300k north-west of Melbourne in the wheat fields of Victoria’s Wimmera region. I believe this photo was taken in the main street, Wood Street, in the 1880s and based on a conversation some years ago with a Donald local history group it seems to be a quite well known “postcard”.

At 8 Wood Street at about the same time was the store of Robert Campbell Hannah, Margaret Wilson’s brother-in-law (I have a bit on the store here). Although eventually broken off, Margaret’s niece, Williamina, was engaged for a while to the son of William John Waddell, owner of the store pictured.

A few more of “Old Hiawatha”

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This group of photos are from Lavinia Shaw‘s album. The first four are smallish paper prints glued onto a single page of the album taken around ““Old Hiawatha”” in Balaclava.
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“View at Hiawatha from the garden”

c1884

This was probably taken around 1884 and although no definite identification can be made it is probably Effie and Eva on the path with Lavinia and Amelia looking on from the balcony at the front of the house.

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“Old Stone Seat”

c1884

Probably somewhere in the garden at the front of the house.

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“Group at the Fountain”

A similar photo also in Lavinia’s album and possibly taken the same day. This is a small print (about 2″ x 2″) and quite likely has been cut from a larger print in horizontal format – maybe a reject from the day’s shooting?

Or on second thoughts maybe not. If that is Eva standing on the left she looks a bit younger than in the 1884, maybe 11 or 12? That would date the photo to about 1883. The other women may then be Rebecca Thomas, 16, her mother Sarah Thomas (nee Heywood), 51, Lavinia, 21, (?), Elinor Thomas, 14, and Effie, 15. In the front are Ernest, 18, and Arthur, 24. At the back in the bowler hat it may be Hugh Thomas, 18, who in the 1880s was apprenticed as a tinsmith to the Shaw family business.

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“Capua Villa”

c1879

In about 1884 the larger two story Hiawatha was built over or near this pre-1869 villa. I’ve dated it to about 1879 assuming the boy is Herbert Shaw who looks about 10.

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Capua Villa

c1882

Another shot of the “Capua Villa” probably taken a few years later. We can’t be sure but the group on the verandah may be Alfred (junior), Arthur, Lavinia, Amelia and Effie. It was was found loose in Elsie Ross’ album but was most likely put there more recently by Mary Shaw.

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“Old Hiawatha and Fountain”

c1887

Another from Lavinia’s album. This could be from around the time of Amelia’s wedding in 1887. Alfred Shaw is seated at the left with Lavinia seated between two unidentified women. In the background it looks like Margaret Shaw (nee Wilson) in the middle. The house can be seen between the trees and the fountain is probably the one found during excavations at the rear of what is now 3 The Avenue (note that an advertisement for the property from 1869 mentioned two fountains).

Amelia’s Wedding

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c1887

These two photos are from Lavinia Shaw‘s album. Both seem to have been taken on the day of her sister, Amelia‘s wedding. The wedding was held on the 25th April 1887 at her father’s home, “Old Hiawatha“. Both groups are posed around the left hand end of the verandah on the north west corner of the house. Lavinia’s caption for both photos is “Wedding Group”. Much later Mary Shaw added names for some of the subjects.

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“Wedding Group”

With Mary’s identifications in quotes, standing from the left are “Lavinia”, “Herbert”, one of the Thomas cousins(?), “Amelia Shaw & John Moore” and “Alfred Shaw”. Seated again from the left are “Eva”, “Arthur”(?), Margaret Shaw (nee Wilson), “Effie” and “Alfred (junior)”(?).

Mary didn’t identify Alfred’s second wife Margaret and for some reason she appears blurred or turned away whenever she appears in photos in the albums. I do have one clear portrait of her probably taken a little later so considering it and the dates and her placement in the album photos I don’t think there’s much doubt it is her.

I still have some doubts about Mary’s Identifications of the three older Shaw sons. To me the boy on the right looks like Ernest.

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“Wedding Group”

Across the back are John Moore’s father, William Moore, 2 unknown women (although the woman on the left may appear in an earlier 1884 photo), Lavinia, Margaret Shaw, Alfred Henry Shaw, John Clarke (husband of Mary Jakeman Clarke (nee Heywood), Effie Shaw and Amelia. At the front a Thomas cousin, Eva, Arthur(?), two women (is that the other Thomas cousin on the right?), Herbert and Ernest.

There is a possible identification for one of the “unknown women”. William Moore was a Baptist minister and would have travelled from Brisbane for the wedding. a long and ardous journey in 1887. I have a 1903 photo of his wife, Margaret, who would have been about 64 at the time and it is pretty certain that she does not appear here. William and Margaret had one daughter, Elizabeth, who would have been about 25. Could this be her at with the hat (and very pinched waist) at the rear.

The women’s clothes are a clue too. Amelia, Effie and Eva are in bridal white but most of the other women are in what look like very sumptuous satin dresses with strips of velvet at cuff and lapel. Only two vary from this, the possible Moore daughter and the woman in white and black at the front. The latter rests her hand on Margaret Shaw’s lap and seems slightly distracted. Margaret had only been in Australia for six months so who other than close family would be this familiar? Her sister’s Hannah family had no girls of this age so is this the other Thomas girl? She doesn’t appear with her sister in the other wedding group so maybe she was unwell? This may explain why she is dressed so differently to to her sister. I did consider that the other seated girl might be the other Thomas sister but even though the dress conforms her features don’t seem to fit with the earlier photos.

Rebecca Thomas married a year later and lived on until 1959. Her younger sister Elinor never married and died in 1927. I’m guessing that it’s Rebecca on the left and Elinor with Margaret.

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